MEA

princessnovak:

Reason #89099999 why Misha is the most incredible human being to roam this Earth

frozen-delight-blog:

marybegone:

mamalaz:

BBC Sherlock in the original Victorian era

wow!

Brilliant!

ssharmander:

THE DRAW // an allison argent mix

just listen to your friends

they only care and hope you’re alright

[l i s t e n]

bostonjaeger:

pairings where they “hate” each other but would be devastated if anything happened to one another aRE MY FUCKING WEAKNESS 

stick-em-with-the-pointy-end:

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired
i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do


what a time to be alive

stick-em-with-the-pointy-end:

gallifreyan-gallimaufry:

leda74:

therothwoman:

beowulfstits-archive:

I want to go to this exact point and run around it saying “I’m in Sweden!” I’m in Finland!” “I’m in Norway!” until I get tired

i aspire to great things in life

According to Google Maps, that point is in the middle of a small lake.

So we’ll do it in January when it’s frozen.

actually that’s why they’ve helpfully dropped a big-ass cement block with a bridge surrounding it in the middle of the lake: for the express purpose of doing what OP aspires to do

what a time to be alive

suluboo:

relationship tip #78: ‘babe’ and ‘baby’ are cliche and outdated. try a fun new nickname such as ‘lieutenant’ instead 

astudyinrose:

Plot twist: Janine dies at the age of 60, after a long bout with cancer. In her will, she leaves the cottage in Sussex to Sherlock and John, jointly, but with the caveat that they could only accept it if they both lived there.

"I know what kind of man you are, Sherlock Holmes," she wrote in the will. "It’s time to let John know too."

ging-ler:

animalbks:

fire-nation-prince-zuko:

I made a powerpoint of why I’m mad about the Korra pull. I understand it’s not cancelled (thank god), but I’m still upset.

You kinda just proved their point

Sponge Bob is on the air because it makes money, not because its good. It doesnt have to be good, its still going to make money

Korra isnt going to make money, no matter how feminist it is, no matter how good you think it is. It may be better than spongebob, but if good shows stayed on the air forever firefly would be in its like 20th season

Korra is going to digital distribution so they can make money in another way, and put a more money making show in that time block so they can continue to produce Avatar Content in a different stream. And again to Firefly, if firefly was aired yesterday then cancelled, you can bet it would also go digital. 

Digital means its cheaper to produce. You dont need to pay for anything but production and server costs. You dont need to compete with other cable companies, and you can make more on repeat viewings since people will be watching every episode at a time, not just once a week. 

If they do it right, this is the best damn news you could hope for. 

But you realize that Avatar: The Last Air Bender was always on air, also competing with Spongebob. What this person is trying to say is that Korra deserves to have a show, like ATLA. That was on air and it only had three books and none of them flopped. Spongebob has had it’s show for 15 years and the shows aren’t even that great anymore. It’s just not fair that the shows that deserve more attention in marketing and on channels are being put aside for shows that should have been canceled 5 years ago.

silent-fun:

Uni!lock - Studying isn’t so important

kateargen:

Teen Wolf AU - As a banshee, Lydia can see Allison’s ghost. At first, it’s almost like having her best friend back, but it’s not long before Allison begins to turn vengeful, as spirits so often do.

boywhocriedwerewolf:

ohmycarveredlund:

nepeta-lives:

I came out as a queer during football practice when my coach was like “son, you’re having trouble throwing straight” and I replied “I’m also having trouble being straight”. It got very quiet and then coach just shook his head and said “throw the damn ball, Cooper”

i have been laughing for 3 million years

unknownexplorers:

oh my god

unknownexplorers:

oh my god

thirliewhirl:

girls, who were bullied most of their life and gain confidence at one point, should be feared most because they dont take anyone’s shit no longer and they will destroy you if you think otherwise

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.